News from British and Canadian Conservatives

Monday, May 21, 2007

A brief interlude

I'm having two wisdom teeth out tomorrow. Hopefully, I'll bounce back pretty quickly - I get far too bored to sit around for long. I might not be updating this blog for a few days though, so please bear with me!

Fiona Jones

The story of Fiona Jones, the once high flying Labour MP, elected in 1997 with every prospect of a great career ahead of her who sadly drank herself to a premature death earlier this year was highlighted in the Sunday Times Magazine yesterday. The article may only be telling one side of the argument, but it does illustrate the some of the problems faced within politics. I'm quite certain that these kinds of disputes are not exclusive to Labour, and politician and activists of all political colours should not be affraid to unite to prevent similar tragedies elsewhere.

Hat tip to Ian Dale

Saturday, May 19, 2007

Oxford Lib Dems defect to Conservative

Oxford Conservatives are celebrating after two Lib Dems defected from the ruling group on the council, to become the first Tories in the city for years. Councillors Tia MacGregor, Quarry and Risinghurst, and Paul Sargent, Carfax, officially switched parties to the Conservatives on Friday, reports the BBC.

It's a good start for the party as they prepare for next years elections in Oxford - the council is elected by halves, so it did not vote this year.

The new makeup of the city council is:
Labour - 18
Lib Dem - 16
Green - 8
Independent Working Class Association - 4
Conservative - 2

The Lib Dems have been running a minority administration, with some support from the Greens. It is not clear whether that will continue. The two parties no longer have a majority between them, holding exactly half the seats. The Labour Lord Mayor will have the casting vote in the event of a tie.

There have been suggestions that there may be others willing to make the switch, so it sounds like all is not well in Oxford Lib Dems. Do they have their own Beaumont, perhaps?

Mayor Making - not the usual tame affair

Last night's Mayor Making will go down in history as probably the most fiery AGM ever, following clashes in the chamber over the appointment of the new Mayor. It was clear from the outset that it was not going to be the usual smooth affair. Cllr Copping (People First) started proceedings with two points of order. One related to the running order of the meeting not being in accordance with standing orders, and they second raised the failure of the new Lib Dem administration to follow protocol and include opposition councillors in discussions about the Mayoralty, prior to the public event. It was a clear shot across the bows of the new leadership to make them aware that they will not be allowed to do as they please with no scrutiny.

Subsequently, when the Lib Dem leadership rose to nominate their chosen Mayoral candidate, the heat was raised further. Cllr Copping took the floor to speak about literature sent to residents in outgoing mayor Janet Andrew's East Ward. The letter, which I have not seen, was considered by many to be nasty and inappropriate, and was signed by the new Lib Dem Mayor for 2007/2008. Cllr Copping related that the incoming mayor had denied any knowledge of this letter, and asked him to confirm that conversation. The new mayor refused to acknowledge that conversation had ever taken place, leading to Cllr Copping swearing on the bible that the new mayor is a "liar"! Councillors Copping and Marsh refused to attend the post-event reception in protest at the mayor's "lies" in the chamber. As a bystander, I can neither confirm nor deny whether these allegations were true.

For me, the most amazing comment came from the "fragrant" Cllr Beaumont, who said to the town chaplain - "I hate it when things get all political". As the politicker-in chief, she really has some nerve. The woman really has lost it. She subsequently had a row with ex councillor Lynne Smith, which may explain her early departure from the celebration.

The evening became even more eventful for me. Someone who I've never seen before walked up to me from behind and punched me, while we were in Jolson's. I have a fat lip this morning, but no permanent damage. I don't know the reason for the attack - I may simply have been in the wrong place at the wrong time. Anyway, the bouncer who was standing right by us refused to take any action. The other bouncers were much more helpful, but were unable to do anything about it by then. The police outside watched him fighting in the street and refused to intervene or talk to him about his assault on me. They did take statements and and will be coming to see me in the week, but I don't understand why they didn't strike while the iron was hot. Hopefully they know what they're doing!

Shepway Cabinet Appointed

At its meeting on Wednesday, Shepway District Council voted for Cllr Robert Bliss to remain leader for the ensuing year. He will be supported by a cabinet of nine members, including a mixture of new and old faces. In Morehall, our own Cllr Peter Monk has been appointed Vice Chairman of the Audit and Compliance committee.

I gather that the meeting was not particularly eventful, although People First did refuse to take their allotted seats next to the Lib Dems, choosing to sit behind the Conservatives instead. The level of distrust and dislike between the two groups is so strong, that I wonder where it may eventually lead. A few years ago, no-one would have predicted that there would be a time when councillors Copping and Marsh would rather sit with the Tories than the Lib Dems!

Friday, May 18, 2007

Sarkozy goes Atlantic

In the wake of his Presidential victory in France, Sarkozy has announced his new cabinet. The Socialists have been quick to disown their own Senator Bernard Kouchner, who has joined as Foreign Secretary. He stood out from his colleagues due to his Atlanticist leanings.

The Prime Minister, Francois Fillon, is also considered an Anglophile. His wife is Welsh and his favourite drink is said to be tea!

Wednesday, May 16, 2007

We're all in the Brown

John McDonnell has announced that he is withdrawing from the contest to lead the Labour Party, as he is unable to attract enough support from fellow Labour MPs to get on the ballot paper. The news means that Brown will now be declared leader of the Labour Party unopposed. I'm not sure that's really good news for him - it means that he doesn't even have a mandate from his party, let alone the electorate. On the other hand, it does demonstrate that he has the full support of almost all Labour MPs. Only 44 MPs have not signed up to Brown's nomination - meaning that McDonnell is now unable to gain the required 45 signatures. He only managed 29, with a further 15 refusing to back either candidate. There has been speculation that at least one Labour MP may be willing to cross the floor and join the Conservatives, with Frank Field's name often mentioned on blogs. Only time will tell on that front.

The Deputy Leadership contest will still go ahead, with at least 5 candidates. So far, only Hilary Benn has not managed to attract enough supporters, with just hours to go until the deadline.

Three brains are better than two

Kent Conservative MPs Roger Gale and Ann Widdecombe have joined forces with KCC leader Paul Carter to condemn the new Conservative education policy. Shadow Education Secretary David Willetts, known as "Two Brains", revealed that the next Conservative Government has no plans to introduce further grammar schools, choosing to support Labour's unproved Academy scheme instead. Kent anti-Grammar campaigners Stop the Eleven Plus (STEP) used Mr Willetts' announcement to launch an attack on Kent's best schools. STEP has launched several unsuccessful attempts to force the closure of Kent's grammars, due to lack of public support for their campaign.

I have to say, that I'm a supporter of grammars. I attended Folkestone's Harvey Grammar School between 1991-1998. It provided me with an excellent and well rounded education, which enabled me to study at Cambridge University. I would fight to the death to defend Kent's grammars and I'm pleased to see our MPs and council leaders doing likewise.

In an ideal world, I would like to see grammars throughout the country. However, I also recognise that the last thing that schools, children and teachers need is the massive upheaval involved in transferring schools over. That would inevitably damage education standards for a period of several years. The same would be true of abolishing grammars where they do already exist - please note that STEP. Moreover, no Conservative government has created new grammar schools for decades, so this is anything but a surprise.

I actually think a lot of the detail in the plans is rather good. In particular, I like the freedom being given to academies and the opportunity to develop chains of schools. There are clear opportunities for the best Headteachers to earn further promotion and improve the education of a lot more children. However, why can't these academies be given more freedom to, say, become grammar schools?

For me, the real disappointment here is not the policy itself. I'm a pragmatist at heart, after all. However, the presentation of the findings has been riddled with lazy liberal-left pap. Watching the junior minister interviewed on BBC South East Today this evening was painful. He defended the position in terms of equality and the number of children entitled to free school dinners. It was nothing short of Socialism, and had no place in the mouth of a Tory. He did not seem to be remotely interested in the best way to teach or how to provide quality in our schools. It really is time for the right to take the e back out of equality. It has no place there and until we recognise that our country will continue to decline.

David Willetts' speech in full
Roger Gale's response on the BBC
www.kentonline.co.uk featuring Ann Widdecombe, Paul Carter and Roger Gale
The article on www.conservatives.com

Tuesday, May 15, 2007

Lib Dems bury bad news

You really can't make this up. The day that Shepway Lib Dems admit their PPC has resigned, it gets second billing on their website. What could possibly be bigger news on the local Lib Dem political scene? A missing dog, of course! Whilst I'm sure that an owner's dog being lost or stolen is deeply distressing for them, it really is not the most imporant thing to have happened to Shepway Lib Dems. Cllr "Pravda" Prater should be ashamed. Sadly, the Lib Dem leadership here have no shame at all.

I know there's been a lot of Lib Dem bashing here lately, but I think that it's justified, all things considered. I'm looking forward to being able to get back to more positive stories as we start to see the new Conservative administration at Shepway pay dividends.

Lib Dem resigns - who's next for the chop?

Shepway Lib Dems have delivered the party's first resignation in the wake of their recent electoral disaster. Toby Philpott, who was only selected as their parliamentary candidate last November, was never the first choice of the local leadership. It seems that he has now paid the price for persuading the membership to back him over local council leader Lynne Beaumont.

The move comes as no surprise. It is not the first time that Cllr Beaumont has elbowed rivals asside in the name of her career. Since her election as Councillor for Folkestone Park in 2003, she first led a coup against long standing local Lib Dem leader Linda Cufley. That led to the group splitting, with 19 of the 30 members leaving the group by the 2007 election. Next for the chop was Fiona Carroll, wife of the then PPC Peter Carroll. Lynne and Peter now live together and plan to marry.

Meanwhile, local chairman, Cllr Prater has been quick to issue a statement through the increasingly Pravda-like local Lib Dem press machine. Apparently he wishes Toby and his family all the best and the resignation is against a backdrop of the success of the elections, which returned fewer Lib Dems in Shepway than at any time since their formation. So the knives were in, for a change? This is the same organ that produced Cllr Beaumont's most amazing claim to date. Apparently, Ex Lib Dem Councillor David Callahan resigned from the party due to "frustration with the Tory whip system". A clear and obvious reason to resign as a Lib Dem, obviously!

It does strike me as strange. The Chairman of the local Lib Dems is responsible for campaigning and the Leader of the Council group is responsible for spearheading policy. So why is it that the PPC resigns when local people reject a negative campaign to promote tired policies, none of which said anything about the future? How long will their local members accept their mistreatment by the cabal running the local Lib Dems? Have they not realised that, compared to the 2005 County Council elections, when all 6 Shepway seats went Tory and Peter Carroll was their candidate for the general election, their results have actually improved?

Perhaps more significantly on the national stage, the local Lib Dem leadership all publicly backed Chris Huhne for the party leadership. Ming should watch his back if he's ever in the vicinity of Folkestone.

Clearly, I'm no Lib Dem. I'd rather amputate my own limbs than vote for that rabble. However, the state of the local party is a symptom of the underlying problems which turn me off the party. Toby Philpott was not such a symptom. I only met him once, and spoke to him briefly. I had no urge to punch him, which is the greatest compliment I can give to a Lib Dem parliamentary hopeful. He came across as honest and was very likeable, which sets him apart from many in the local Lib Dem leadership. It's a shame that there's no room for people like him in the Lib Dems anymore.

Source: Hawkinge Gazette & Channel Coast News

Sunday, May 13, 2007

Vive La France


The Sunday Times reports that one of Sarkozy's first acts as the new President of France has been to block plans for a new migrant centre at Sandgatte. That's fantastic news for those of us living in Kent, who found ourselves in the front line before the previous centre was closed in 2002. At that time, Sarkozy was the Interior Minister, with ultimate responsibility for Sandgatte. I've been vindicated in my support for Sarkozy prior to the election!

Such an outbreak of pro-French thinking is uncharacteristic of me! However, my principle objection to the French has never been the people themselves, but their obsession with electing left wing politicians - in which category I include Chirac. So far, it seems that Sarkozy has broken that pattern and I congratulate the French people on that!

One cloud does still loom on the horizon though - the EU Constitution. It was the French who we have to thank again for killing it off with their rejection by referendum. However, there is always the threat that it will come back through the back door. Angela Merkel, the German Chancellor who currently holds the rotating European Presidency, is known to favour the introduction of certain elements of the constitution through a new treaty, which most countries would be able to ratify without a referendum. It seems that Sarkozy and Blair both favour the same option.

It is quite clear that Labour's pledge to hold a referendum on the EU constitution should be honoured if they wish to bring in most of the elements of it through a new document. Blair, through his usual web of spin and deceit, does not think so. He believes that Parliament should be allowed to give our country away, without the people having the opportunity to say "no". David Cameron and the Conservatives have already made clear that they support a referendum on any such treaty, and I hope that we will be able to apply pressure to ensure that one is held, as we did for the Constitution. That will be an excellent opportunity for the people of Britain to say no to the "ever closer" union, and for the Conservatives to reaffirm our Eurosceptic credentials and pick up some new supporters.

Euroflop


The UK sunk to ignominious defeat once again in Eurovision, scoring just 19 points - joint 22nd with France. Only Ireland performed worse, scoring 5 points, all of which came from Albania, bizarrely! The UK picked up 7 points from Ireland and an amazing maximum 12 points from Malta. Perhaps we should go there for our honeymoon!

It's a pity. Scooch deserved better from a well performed and catchy song. The worst song in the contest was the Armenian entry, yet the qualified for next year's final with 8th position and 138 ponts.

Serbia must have been the least deserving winner in many years. The song was an instantly forgettable dirge, performed by an exceptionally unattractive "woman" who looked like she probably has to shave every morning. She may have looked better if she wasn't wearing a man's suit (with trainers for crying out loud - do Serbs have no sense of style at all?). Also, Sinead O'Connor was able to carry off cropped to non-existent hair, but Marija Serifovic is no Sinead O'Connor, I'm affraid. To her credit, she can sing well. That just didn't make up for the otherwise unremarkable song and performance though.

The rise of Eastern Europe to dominate the contest does concern me. Not so much for its impact on Eurovision. I'm more concerned about the direction it may lead the EU. There are a lot of similarities between Eurovision and the EU - in both cases the money comes from a small number of Western nations but the power seems to rest with the large number of Eastern countries, who are net recipients of funds.

Thursday, May 10, 2007

Saga not down and out yet

There have been reports in the media this week suggesting that Saga's whole business could be threatened by the new anti-discrimination legislation which the government is bringing in to combat age discrimination. The legislation is designed to stop employers from refusing to take on staff because they are too old, or too young for example. However, there have been fears that the laws could be badly drafted (as they were for IR35), resulting in all sorts of businesses and organisations being threatened. These could include Help the Aged, Saga and Club 18-30, to mention just a few.

The management at Saga have moved to reassure staff, customers and potential investors that they are working with the government to ensure that the laws don't cause those problems. They have been lobbying hard for months, as has been reported in some sections of the media. The Equalities Minister confirmed in an interview with Ragio 5 Live that the government isn't trying to destroy niche businesses' market.

The Saga statement concludes: "Customers should be reassured by the Ministers statement that they want people to be able to continue to holiday with others of their own age group. Saga is confident we will continue to serve our customers with great value services tailored to their needs."

Interest rates hit 5.5%

The Bank of England Monetary Policy Committee has voted to increase interest rates once again today. The increase takes rates up to 5.5% and came as no surprise, following recent figures which have shown inflation spiralling out of control. The Governor of the Bank of England, Mervyn King, was forced to write to the Chancellor of the Exchequer to explain why CPI inflation had breached the 3% mark, more than 1% above the official 2% target. Meanwhile, RPI, which more accurately reflects the cost of living in the UK, now stands at more than 4%, also its highest level in years.

So far, the increases in interest rates don't seem to have dampened the housing market very much. However, the high level of debts which have been built up by many individuals will mean that the increase in interest rates will hurt and could cause personal problems. The high level of private debts has largely kept the economy afloat for the past few years could, ultimately, bring it all crashing down as the boom of cheap imports from China and the far east dry up.

On a more personal level, the rise is good news for me. As a non-home owner I am not lumbered with a mortgage or other debts, and my savings accounts will enjoy the extra 0.25% interest, assuming that the rises are passed on by the bank!

Boisclair resigns Parti Quebecois leadership


Following last month's drubbing at the hands of Quebec's electorate, the leader of the nationalists has announced that he is to stand down. The Parti will now seek an interim leader. In the meantime, the Liberal minority goverment has unveiled its priorities for its next term in office. The conservative ADQ, which was the big winner of an election that saw the other parties lose seats and support, is still revelling in its newfound position as HM Official Opposition in Quebec.

Resigning after losing an election seems rather old fashioned - Gordon Brown prefers to go into hiding!

How France Voted

Round One:Round two: Sarkozy, UMP (Conservative) vs Royale, Socialist

It's interesting to see that most of the North went for Sarkozy, with the exception of the Pas de Calais, where Royale won by 4%. Even there, in the first round the UMP topped the polls.

Sources. Round 1= Wikipedia; Round 2=rfi

Eurovision Song Contest

The Eurovision Song Contest Semi-Final is this evening from 9pm CET (8PM BST) on BBC3. Britain automatically qualifes for the final on Saturday, but here's our entry in case you have missed it so far!

Wednesday, May 09, 2007

Lib Dems demand resignations

...but can't agree who should resign. They are all sure of one thing; someone is to blame for their catostrophic results in Thursday's election. Let the finger pointing commence.

In Wales, the Lib Dems failed to make any progress, trailing in fourth place with six seats in the Assembly. The leader, Mike German, issued a joint statement with the chairman of the Welsh Lib Dems stating that there had been preliminary talks, but that they should be held in private rather than by megaphone. Quite how that sits with them being called democrats is anyone's guess - surely everyone should discussions should be open and transparent, not secretive and begind closed doors. Feuding AMs and council leaders were quick to ignore their leaders though. Peter Black AM rejected any deal with Labour and called on Mike German to resign as leader. Kirsty Williams, seen as Mr German's most likely successor, responded by saying that a change of leadership was not a priority. Hardly a ringing endorsement - it leaves three different opinions from three different AMs. Not to be left out of the argument, Eleanor Burnham AM called Mr Black "irresponsible". So Mike German was ignored by three of his five colleagues, and none of them agree with each other.

It seems to be contagious, as council leaders wanted a piece of the action as well. Four of them have already gone on record to oppose a deal with Labour. A fifth, Cllr Rodney Berman of Cardiff City Council, rejected calls for Mr German's resignation were not helpful. Again, not a ringing endorsement, just more disagreement within the ranks.

Meanwhile, in Westminster there is talk of a plot against the beleaguered Lib Dem leader Ming Campbell facing a challenge to his leadership. Supporters of Nick Clegg and Chris Huhne have both been sharpening their knives. Huhnies were particularly quick to point out that in his Eastleigh constituency the Lib Dems had bucked the national trend and gained seats.

Meanwile, Susan Kramer's "support" for Ming on GMTV will not have helped him to sleep any easier. Iain Dale reports her comments as follows:

Susan Kramer: Ming of all things is a person of absolute integrity and I think he’s also harder on himself than almost any outsider would be. I mean, this is not a man who has flexible standards and I think if he felt that he wasn’t taking the party in the direction it needed to go, that if he didn’t see those changes happening, you know, internally, in the policy area, that had to be in place, he might well make that decision, but I think most of us looking at him basically would say ‘Ming, stick with it. This is not the time for revolving door politics, not the time to choose your leader by focus group, or how they look in a shop window. This is a time to choose your leader by their real qualities of integrity, determination, statesmanship, intelligence and a vision of taking Britain forward. I really do think that matters the most.
So, in a nutshell, she thinks that his integrity will lead him to resign if he is unable to take the party in the right direction. I assume that losing more than 10% of their councillors, dropping in the popular vote, losing ground in Scotland and remaining an irrelevant force in Wales might not be the direction in which most Lib Dems would want Ming to lead the party! Having said that, Mark Oaten showed that they gain pleasure in bizarre ways, so maybe electoral disaster is Kramer's idea of good fun!

In Scotland, Ming Campbell is said to have over-ruled the local leadership and blocked any possible deal with the SNP. In public, the reason for their refusal to do a deal is that the SNP are demanding a referendum on independence as part of any deal. The SNP have been quick to point out that they are prepared to come to the negotiating table without any preconditions. The real reason that the Lib Dems won't play ball may have something to do with the cosy personal relationship between Ming and Gordon Brown, who has already made clear that he won't cooperate with a nationalist-led Parliament. Ming has previously set out some key tests for Brown - if these are met, he plans to prop up a Brown led Lib-Lab coalition in the event of a hung parliament at Westminster.

Meanwhile, here in Shepway I understand that some Lib Dem councillors are looking for a fall guy to carry the can for their collapse. Of course, we all know that Beaumont and co are past masters of the finger pointing. When they raised tax by 39%, were capped, closed the toilets, cut back on street cleaning and stopped cutting the grass, the fingers variably pointed at either the Labour government or the previous Conservative administration. When that failed, they ousted Linda Cufley and the rest of their leadership. Apparently this small group had forced the rest of the Lib Dems to support these ridiculous schemes. Of course, it wasn't part of a master plan to undermine the financial competence of the Tories in Michael Howard's back yard at a time when he was Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer. Peter Carroll, their then PPC and now councillor and lover of new leader Beaumont, never had any involvement in the decision making process. And perish the thought that any faxes may have been sent from the Cowley Street HQ to "persuade" Linda Cufley of the advantages of going along with the Lib Dem plan.

Well, just when you think they must have run out of fingers to point, another one comes along. Anne Boleyn was accused of being a witch because she had six fingers on one hand. Lynne Beaumont is known by her colleagues (behind her back of course) as "The Bitch", so there's a clear resemblence. This time the finger of blame is pointing at PPC Toby Philpott, I understand. Of course, until he came along in November, everything was going swimmingly. They had lost so many councillors through defections and by-elections that Shepway was controlled by a Conservative minority who easily outnumbered the previous Lib Dem majority administration. In Hythe, they had gone from 14 out of 16 seats to losing overall control! Even in the Lib Dem stronhold of Folkestone, they reached a low point with only one councillor on the Town Council.

It's hard to see how Toby can be blamed really, when it's clear that the Lib Dems problems stem from a time before he was on the scene. The last election in Shepway was the Cheriton by-election, in which the Chairman of the Lib Dems won with 504 votes (42%). This time, he took 673 votes, with the Lib Dems on 46%. In Folkestone Harvey Central, the Conservative majority over the Lib Dem was sliced to just 21 votes. That compares to the 2005 by-election, when the Lib Dems fell to third behind Labour, almost 300 votes behind the same Conservative candidate!

As a Tory, I can't say that I'm concerned either way whether Toby stays or goes. The local Conservative Campaign team will be equally happy fighting Toby, Beaumont, Carroll or whoever else they may care to throw at us. It does seem rather unreasonable to try to pin the blame for all this on to the newcomer though, and I think that he'll feel rather abused. So may the membership, who backed Toby over the leading cabal's preferred candidate, the "fragrant" Lynne Beaumont. I can't say that I'd blame him if he did resign though - when you can't trust the people who are supposedly there to support you, how can you mount a serious election campaign? I would have thought that responsibility for the lacklustre results should lie with either the Group Leader or the Chairman, who between them are responsible for policy and campaigning. Perhaps that's just too logical for the Lib Dem leadership to grasp though.

All in all, the Lib Dems across the country have one thing in common - they all want someone to carry the blame for their disasterous results last Thursday. If only they could agree who....

"What are the Liberal Democrats for?"

It's a question that I've asked myself frequently in the past, but this time I'm not the one who's asking. It's the Guardian - that bastion of liberal-left ideology. It will have made some pretty uncomfortable reading for Ming Campbell and the rest of his Lib Dem posse. Under the title "Nice but hopeless, the Lib Dems should call it a day" Simon Jenkins adds "Surely it's time to disband":


What are Liberal Democrats for? They are the flotsam of 20th-century politics drifting on into the 21st, coagulated from ancient clubs, cabals, splits and defections from other parties. Not since the 19th century have they cohered round any great interest. They represent no mass movement, no breaking of the political mould. Ask a Liberal Democrat what he or she is for and you get only a susurration of platitudes. Yet thanks to proportional representation this party gets to choose the governments of Scotland and Wales. It is Nero for a day.


Quite. The full article is here.

Hat tip to Iain Dale, whose blog brought this to my attention.

How England Voted

PARTY Councils Councillors
Gain Loss Change Total Gain Loss Change Total

Conservative

+39 165

+911 5315

Liberal Democrats

−4 23

−246 2171

Labour

−8 34

−504 1877

Residents Associations

0 1

−19 67

Green

0 0

+17 62

British National Party

0 0

+1 10

Liberal

0 0

−1 9

Mebyon Kernow

0 0

+1 7

UK Independence

0 0

−1 5

Health Concern

0 0

+1 4

Respect

0 0

0 3

Socialist Alternative

0 0

−1 0

Other

0 4

−162 949

No overall control

−27 85 - - - -

Metropolitan boroughs

All 36 English Metropolitan borough councils had one third of their seats up for election.

Council Previous control Result Details
Barnsley
Labour
Labour hold
Birmingham
No overall control
No overall control hold
Bolton
No overall control
No overall control hold
Bradford
No overall control
No overall control hold
Bury
No overall control
No overall control hold
Calderdale
No overall control
No overall control hold
Coventry
Conservative
Conservative hold
Doncaster
No overall control
No overall control hold
Dudley
Conservative
Conservative hold
Gateshead
Labour
Labour hold
Kirklees
No overall control
No overall control hold
Knowsley
Labour
Labour hold Details
Leeds
No overall control
No overall control hold
Liverpool
Liberal Democrats
Liberal Democrats hold Details
Manchester
Labour
Labour hold
Newcastle upon Tyne
Liberal Democrats
Liberal Democrats hold
North Tyneside
No overall control
No overall control hold Details
Oldham
Labour
No overall control
Rochdale
No overall control
Liberal Democrats gain Details
Rotherham
Labour
Labour hold
Salford
Labour
Labour hold
Sandwell
Labour
Labour hold
Sefton
No overall control
No overall control hold
Sheffield
Labour
No overall control Details
Solihull
Conservative
No overall control
South Tyneside
Labour
Labour hold
St Helens
No overall control
No overall control hold
Stockport
Liberal Democrats
Liberal Democrats hold
Sunderland
Labour
Labour hold
Tameside
Labour
Labour hold
Trafford
Conservative
Conservative hold Details
Wakefield
Labour
Labour hold
Walsall
Conservative
Conservative hold
Wigan
Labour
Labour hold
Wirral
No overall control
No overall control hold
Wolverhampton
Labour
Labour hold

Unitary authorities

Whole council up for election

In 25 English Unitary authorities the whole council was up for election.

Council Previous control Result Details
Bath and North East Somerset
No overall control
No overall control hold
Blackpool
Labour
Conservative gain Details
Bournemouth
Liberal Democrats
Conservative gain
Bracknell Forest
Conservative
Conservative hold
Brighton & Hove
No overall control
No overall control hold Details
Darlington
Labour
Labour hold
East Riding of Yorkshire
No overall control
Conservative gain Details
Herefordshire
No overall control
Conservative gain
Leicester
No overall control
Labour gain
Luton
No overall control
Labour gain
Medway
Conservative
Conservative hold
Middlesbrough
Labour
Labour hold
North Lincolnshire
Conservative
Labour gain Details
North Somerset
No overall control
Conservative gain
Nottingham
Labour
Labour hold
Poole
Conservative
Conservative hold
Redcar and Cleveland
No overall control
No overall control hold
Rutland
Conservative
Conservative hold
South Gloucestershire
No overall control
No overall control hold
Stockton-on-Tees
No overall control
No overall control hold
Telford and Wrekin
No overall control
No overall control hold
Torbay
Liberal Democrats
Conservative gain
West Berkshire
Conservative
Conservative hold
Windsor and Maidenhead
Liberal Democrats
Conservative gain
York
Liberal Democrats
No overall control

One third of council up for election

In 20 English Unitary authorities one third of the council was up for election.

Council Previous control Result Details
Blackburn with Darwen
Labour
No overall control
Bristol
No overall control
No overall control hold
Derby
No overall control
No overall control hold
Halton
Labour
Labour hold
Hartlepool
Labour
Labour hold
Kingston upon Hull
No overall control
Liberal Democrats gain
Milton Keynes
No overall control
No overall control hold
North East Lincolnshire
No overall control
No overall control hold
Peterborough
Conservative
Conservative hold
Plymouth
No overall control
Conservative gain
Portsmouth
No overall control
No overall control hold
Reading
Labour
Labour hold
Slough
No overall control
No overall control hold Details
Southampton
No overall control
No overall control hold
Southend-on-Sea
Conservative
Conservative hold
Stoke-on-Trent
No overall control
No overall control hold
Swindon
Conservative
Conservative hold
Thurrock
Conservative
No overall control
Warrington
No overall control
No overall control hold
Wokingham
Conservative
Conservative hold

District councils

Whole council up for election

In 153 English district authorities the whole council was up for election.

Council Previous control Result Details
Allerdale
No overall control
No overall control hold
Alnwick
No overall control
No overall control hold
Arun
Conservative
Conservative hold
Ashfield
Labour
No overall control Details
Ashford
Conservative
Conservative hold Details
Aylesbury Vale
Conservative
Conservative hold
Babergh
No overall control
No overall control hold
Berwick-upon-Tweed
No overall control
No overall control hold
Blaby
Conservative
Conservative hold
Blyth Valley
Labour
Labour hold
Bolsover
Labour
Labour hold
Boston
No overall control
Independent gain
Braintree
No overall control
Conservative gain
Breckland
Conservative
Conservative hold
Bridgnorth
No overall control
No overall control hold
Broadland
Conservative
Conservative hold
Bromsgrove
Conservative
Conservative hold
Broxtowe
No overall control
No overall control hold
Canterbury
No overall control
Conservative gain
Caradon
No overall control
Liberal Democrats gain
Carrick
Liberal Democrats
No overall control
Castle Morpeth
No overall control
No overall control hold
Charnwood
No overall control
Conservative gain
Chelmsford
Conservative
Conservative hold
Chester-le-Street
Labour
Labour hold
Chesterfield
Liberal Democrats
Liberal Democrats hold
Chichester
Conservative
Conservative hold
Chiltern
Conservative
Conservative hold
Christchurch
Conservative
Conservative hold
Copeland
Labour
Labour hold
Corby
Labour
Labour hold Details
Cotswold
Conservative
Conservative hold
Dacorum
Conservative
Conservative hold
Dartford
No overall control
Conservative gain
Derbyshire Dales
Conservative
Conservative hold
Derwentside
Labour
Labour hold
Dover
No overall control
Conservative gain
Durham
Liberal Democrats
Liberal Democrats hold
Easington
Labour
Labour hold
Eastbourne
Conservative
Liberal Democrats gain
East Cambridgeshire
No overall control
Conservative gain
East Devon
Conservative
Conservative hold
East Dorset
Conservative
Conservative hold
East Hampshire
Conservative
Conservative hold
East Hertfordshire
Conservative
Conservative hold
East Lindsey
No overall control
No overall control hold
East Northamptonshire
Conservative
Conservative hold
East Staffordshire
Conservative
Conservative hold
Eden
Independent
No overall control
Epsom and Ewell
Residents Association
Residents Association hold
Erewash
No overall control
Conservative gain
Fenland
Conservative
Conservative hold
Forest Heath
Conservative
Conservative hold
Forest of Dean
No overall control
Conservative gain
Fylde
Conservative
Conservative hold Details
Gedling
No overall control
Conservative gain
Gravesham
Labour
Conservative gain
Guildford
Conservative
Conservative hold
Hambleton
Conservative
Conservative hold
Harborough
No overall control
Conservative gain
High Peak
No overall control
Conservative gain
Hinckley and Bosworth
Conservative
Liberal Democrats gain
Horsham
Conservative
Conservative hold
Kennet
Conservative
Conservative hold
Kerrier
Independent
No overall control
Kettering
Conservative
Conservative hold
King's Lynn and West Norfolk
Conservative
Conservative hold
Lancaster
No overall control
No overall control hold
Lewes
Liberal Democrats
Liberal Democrats hold
Lichfield
Conservative
Conservative hold
Lincoln
Labour
Conservative gain
Maldon
Conservative
Conservative hold
Malvern Hills
No overall control
Conservative gain
Mansfield
Independent
Independent hold
Melton
Conservative
Conservative hold
Mendip
Conservative
Conservative hold
Mid Bedfordshire
Conservative
Conservative hold
Mid Devon
No overall control
No overall control hold
Mid Suffolk
No overall control
Conservative gain
Mid Sussex
No overall control
Conservative gain
New Forest
Conservative
Conservative hold
Newark and Sherwood
No overall control
Conservative gain
North Cornwall
No overall control
No overall control hold
North Devon
Liberal Democrats
Conservative gain
North Dorset
No overall control
Conservative gain
North East Derbyshire
Labour
Labour hold
North Hertfordshire
Conservative
Conservative hold
North Kesteven
No overall control
Conservative gain
North Norfolk
Liberal Democrats
Liberal Democrats hold
North Shropshire
No overall control
Conservative gain
North Warwickshire
No overall control
Conservative gain
North West Leicestershire
Labour
Conservative gain
North Wiltshire
No overall control
Conservative gain
Northampton
No overall control
Liberal Democrats gain
Oadby and Wigston
Liberal Democrats
Liberal Democrats hold
Oswestry
No overall control
Conservative gain
Restormel
No overall control
No overall control hold
Ribble Valley
Conservative
Conservative hold
Richmondshire
Independent
No overall control
Rother
Conservative
Conservative hold
Rushcliffe
Conservative
Conservative hold
Ryedale
No overall control
No overall control hold
Salisbury
Conservative
No overall control
Scarborough
Conservative
No overall control
Sedgefield
Labour
Labour hold
Sedgemoor
Conservative
Conservative hold
Selby
Conservative
Conservative hold
Sevenoaks
Conservative
Conservative hold
Shepway
No overall control
Conservative gain
South Bucks
Conservative
Conservative hold
South Derbyshire
Labour
Conservative gain
South Hams
Conservative
Conservative hold
South Holland
Conservative
Conservative hold
South Kesteven
Conservative
Conservative hold
South Norfolk
Liberal Democrats
Conservative gain
South Northamptonshire
Conservative
Conservative hold
South Oxfordshire
Conservative
Conservative hold
South Ribble
No overall control
Conservative gain Details
South Shropshire
No overall control
Conservative gain
South Somerset
Liberal Democrats
Liberal Democrats hold
South Staffordshire
Conservative
Conservative hold
Spelthorne
Conservative
Conservative hold
St Edmundsbury
Conservative
Conservative hold
Stafford
Conservative
Conservative hold
Staffordshire Moorlands
No overall control
Conservative gain
Suffolk Coastal
Conservative
Conservative hold
Surrey Heath
Conservative
Conservative hold Details
Taunton Deane
Conservative
No overall control
Teesdale
Independent
Independent hold
Teignbridge
No overall control
No overall control hold
Tendring
No overall control
No overall control hold
Test Valley
Conservative
Conservative hold
Tewkesbury
No overall control
No overall control hold
Thanet
Conservative
Conservative hold
Tonbridge and Malling
Conservative
Conservative hold
Torridge
Independent
No overall control
Tynedale
Conservative
Conservative hold Details
Uttlesford
Liberal Democrats
Conservative gain
Vale of White Horse
Liberal Democrats
Liberal Democrats hold
Vale Royal
No overall control
No overall control hold
Wansbeck
Labour
Labour hold
Warwick
No overall control
Conservative gain
Waverley
No overall control
Conservative gain
Wealden
Conservative
Conservative hold
Wear Valley
Labour
No overall control
Wellingborough
Conservative
Conservative hold
West Devon
No overall control
No overall control hold
West Dorset
Conservative
Conservative hold
West Somerset
Conservative
Independent gain
West Wiltshire
No overall control
Conservative gain
Wychavon
Conservative
Conservative hold
Wycombe
Conservative
Conservative hold
Wyre
Conservative
Conservative hold

One third of council up for election

In 78 English district authorities one third of the council was up for election.

Council Previous control Result Details
Amber Valley
Conservative
Conservative hold
Barrow-in-Furness
No overall control
No overall control hold
Basildon
Conservative
Conservative hold
Basingstoke and Deane
Conservative
Conservative hold
Bassetlaw
Conservative
Conservative hold
Bedford
No overall control
No overall control hold
Brentwood
Conservative
Conservative hold Details
Broxbourne
Conservative
Conservative hold
Burnley
No overall control
No overall control hold
Cambridge
Liberal Democrats
Liberal Democrats hold
Cannock Chase
No overall control
No overall control hold
Carlisle
No overall control
No overall control hold
Castle Point
Conservative
Conservative hold
Cherwell
Conservative
Conservative hold
Chester
No overall control
Conservative gain
Chorley
Conservative
Conservative hold
Colchester
No overall control
No overall control hold
Congleton
Conservative
Conservative hold
Craven
No overall control
No overall control hold
Crawley
Conservative
Conservative hold
Crewe and Nantwich
No overall control
No overall control hold
Daventry
Conservative
Conservative hold
Eastleigh
Liberal Democrats
Liberal Democrats hold
Ellesmere Port and Neston
Labour
Labour hold
Elmbridge
No overall control
No overall control hold
Epping Forest
Conservative
Conservative hold
Exeter
No overall control
No overall control hold
Gloucester
No overall control
No overall control hold
Great Yarmouth
Conservative
Conservative hold
Harlow
No overall control
No overall control hold
Harrogate
No overall control
No overall control hold
Hart
No overall control
No overall control hold
Havant
Conservative
Conservative hold
Hertsmere
Conservative
Conservative hold
Huntingdonshire
Conservative
Conservative hold
Hyndburn
Conservative
Conservative hold
Ipswich
No overall control
No overall control hold
Macclesfield
Conservative
Conservative hold Details
Maidstone
No overall control
No overall control hold
Mole Valley
Conservative
Conservative hold
Newcastle-under-Lyme
No overall control
No overall control hold
Norwich
No overall control
No overall control hold
Pendle
Liberal Democrats
Liberal Democrats hold
Penwith
No overall control
No overall control hold
Preston
No overall control
No overall control hold Details
Purbeck
Conservative
Conservative hold
Redditch
No overall control
No overall control hold
Reigate and Banstead
Conservative
Conservative hold
Rochford
Conservative
Conservative hold
Rossendale
Conservative
Conservative hold
Rugby
No overall control
Conservative gain
Runnymede
Conservative
Conservative hold
Rushmoor
Conservative
Conservative hold
Shrewsbury and Atcham
Conservative
Conservative hold
South Bedfordshire
Conservative
Conservative hold
South Cambridgeshire
No overall control
Conservative gain
South Lakeland
Liberal Democrats
Liberal Democrats hold Details
St Albans
Liberal Democrats
No overall control
Stevenage
Labour
Labour hold
Stratford-on-Avon
Conservative
Conservative hold
Stroud
Conservative
Conservative hold
Swale
Conservative
Conservative hold
Tamworth
Conservative
Conservative hold
Tandridge
Conservative
Conservative hold
Three Rivers
Liberal Democrats
Liberal Democrats hold
Tunbridge Wells
Conservative
Conservative hold
Watford
Liberal Democrats
Liberal Democrats hold
Waveney
Conservative
Conservative hold
Welwyn Hatfield
Conservative
Conservative hold
West Lancashire
Conservative
Conservative hold
West Lindsey
Liberal Democrats
Liberal Democrats hold
West Oxfordshire
Conservative
Conservative hold
Weymouth and Portland
No overall control
No overall control hold
Winchester
Conservative
Conservative hold
Woking
No overall control
Conservative gain
Worcester
Conservative
Conservative hold
Worthing
Conservative
Conservative hold
Wyre Forest
No overall control
No overall control hold

Source: Wikipedia